Oracle Applications FND Useful Tables

Hello Friends , here is some of quite commonly used AOL FND ( Foundation) tables and their usage. There are many other tables also in FND but here i am putting only few commonly used tables. for other table if needed we can dig furthur. Let go through below article and let me know if it useful.






FND_ID_FLEXS stores registration information about key flexfields. Each row includes the four–character code that identifies the key flexfield, the title of the flexfield (by which a user identifies theflexfield), the name of the combinations table that contains the key flexfield columns, and the name of the structure defining (MultiFlex) column for the flexfield (SET_DEFINING_COLUMN_NAME). Each row also contains values that identify the application that owns the combination table and the application that owns the key flexfield, a table–type flag that specifies whether the combinations table is specificor generic (S or G), whether dynamic inserts are feasible for the flexfield(Y or N), whether the key flexfield can use ID type value sets, and the name of the unique ID column in the combinations table. You need one row for each key flexfield in each application. Oracle Application ObjectLibrary uses this information to generate a compiled key flexfield definition

FND_ID_FLEX_SEGMENTS: FND_ID_FLEX_SEGMENTS stores setup information about keyflexfield segments, as well as the correspondences between application table columns and the key flexfield segments the columns are used for. Each row includes a flexfield application identifier, the flexfield code,which identifies the key flexfield, the structure number(ID_FLEX_NUM), the value set application identifier, the segment number (the segment’s sequence in the flexfield window), the name of the column the segment corresponds to (usually SEGMENTn, where n is an integer). Each row also includes the segment name, whether security is enabled for the segment, whether the segment is required, whether the segment is one of a high, low segment pair, whether the segment is displayed, whether the segment is enabled (Y or N), type of default value, display information about the segment such as prompts and display size, and the value set the segment uses. Each row also includes a flag for whether the table column is indexed; this value is normally Y. You need one row for each segment of each structure for each flexfield. Oracle Application Object Library uses this information to generate a compiled key flexfield definition to store in the FND_COMPILED_ID_FLEXS table Thanks – Shivmohan Purohit

FND_ID_FLEX_STRUCTURES : FND_ID_FLEX_STRUCTURES stores structure information about keyflexfields. Each row includes the flexfield code and the structurenumber (ID_FLEX_NUM), which together identify the structure, and the name and description of the structure. Each row also includes values that indicate whether the flexfield structure is currently frozen, whether rollup groups are frozen (FREEZE_STRUCTURED_HIER_FLAG), whether users can dynamically insert new combinations of segment values through the flexfield pop–up window, and whether the flexfield should use segment cross–validation rules. Each row also contains information about shorthand flexfield entry for this structure, including whether shorthand entry is enabled, the prompt for the shorthand window, and the length of the shorthand alias field in the shorthandwindow. You need one row for each structure of each key flexfield. Oracle Application Object Library uses this information to generate acompiled key flexfield definition to store in the FND_COMPILED_ID_FLEXS table

FND_FLEX_VALUES stores valid values for key and descriptive flexfield segments. Oracle Application Object Library uses this table when users define values for independent or dependent type value sets. Oracle Application Object Library also uses this table when users define parent values for ranges of child values that exist in a validation table(Oracle Application Object Library stores the parent values in this table). Each row includes the value (FLEX_VALUE) and its hierarchy level if applicable as well as the identifier of the value set the value belongs to. If the value is a dependent value, PARENT_FLEX_VALUE_LOW contains the independent value this value depends upon. Oracle Application Object Library does not use the PARENT_FLEX_VALUE_HIGH column. If ENABLED_FLAG contains N, this value is currently invalid, regardless of the start and end dates.

If ENABLED_FLAG contains Y, the start and end dates indicate if this value is currently valid.SUMMARY_FLAG indicates if this value is a parent value that has child values, and STRUCTURED_HIERARCHY_LEVEL contains the rollup group the parent value belongs to, if any (1 through 9). COMPILED_VALUE_ATTRIBUTES contains the compiled values of anysegment qualifiers assigned to this value. These values are in a special Oracle Application Object Library format, and you should never modify them.

VALUE_CATEGORY and ATTRIBUTE1 through ATTRIBUTE50 are descriptive flexfield columns, where VALUE_CATEGORY is the context (structure defining) column.

These descriptive flexfield columns do not contain values unless you have defined the descriptive flexfield at your site. You need one row for each independent, dependent or parent value belonging to a value set.Oracle Application Object Library uses this information to ensure that users enter valid values in flexfield segments

FND_FLEX_VALUE_HIERARCHIES stores information about child value ranges for key flexfield segment values. Each row includes an identification of the parent value the range belongs to, as well as the low and high values that make up the range of child values. FLEX_VALUE_SET_ID identifies the value set to which the parent value belongs. You need one row for each range of child values (you can have more than one row for each parent value). Oracle Application Object Library provides this information for applications reporting purposes.


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